A Universe from Nothing? Has Lawrence M. Krauss Missed the Point?

To cut to the chase it is my view that Dr. Lawrence M. Krauss, eminent cosmologist, theoretical physicist, and author of A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing,[1] has missed the point of the argument. Yet, his book is fascinating, and the discoveries he discusses are very significant, perhaps in ways he has not yet considered.

Let me state quite plainly that I accept and respect all the scientific discoveries and theories that Krauss describes. I have neither the skill nor the training to counter them, and nor do I feel a need to do so. I have faith in the integrity and dedication of the scientists who are collecting and analysing the data, and proposing the theories based on mathematical calculation and/or study of the data. If they have it wrong, I know they will correct it, and slowly but surely, the physical scientific realities of the universe will be uncovered. So that is not my focus.

My concern is the philosophical and spiritual interpretation that is derived by scientists from their theories and data, even if it is purely to say that there is no need for God or that what philosophers or theologians might have to say is necessarily of little worth. Accordingly, my mission is to find the middle path reconciling both the scientific and philosophical/spiritual views in a way that is coherent and all-embracing. It is logical to me that there is a theory of everything being uncovered, and that this theory must incorporate science, philosophy, spirituality, religion, and every other body of work and view of the universe, each of course honed to its own accurate and “perfect” set of truths.

Krauss initially changes the question from why there is something rather than nothing, to how there is something rather than nothing. As he points out, using the word why implies purpose, and as a scientist he would rather describe the process of how it is possible for something to derive from nothing.

As with many scientists who see everything as being explained by science, Krauss sees no need for a God or a Creator. Krauss does not consider the possibility that God designed and implemented science’s physical laws in order to create the universe as it is. While I can understand that physical laws need to be coherent and obviously are, there is no reason in my mind why these could not have been designed by a superior Designer to work in just that way. It would appear to me that the how that Krauss insists on discovering is exactly the uncovering of the path that God took to achieve what He (She, It) achieved. In many ways the why question is far more challenging and momentous than the physical and cosmological discoveries under discussion.

Krauss explains three ways in which something can come from nothing. In brief they are (though I accept that my descriptions may not be perfect):

  •  In the first fraction of a second of the Big Bang a period of inflation occurred, where the universe expanded by a factor of more than 1028, and the resulting quantum fluctuations allowed matter to form out of nothing.
  •  A quantum gravity of zero allows, and even initiates, matter (and thus the universe) to be created from nothing. A state of nothing is ultimately unstable.
  • The concept of a multiverse shows that up to 10500 (that is 1 with 500 zeroes) unique universes may exist. Thus by chance our one happens to have the perfect set of physical laws to produce the universe we see.

 Krauss admits that in the first of these three possibilities, the nothing described is empty space storing energy, and allows for the existence of the Laws of Physics. In the second possibility, the need for pre-existing space has been removed. In the third and final way in which something can come from nothing, Krauss takes away the Laws of Physics, in that they become measurements and descriptions of what exists as opposed to needing to pre-exist in order to create the universe we know.

It does not take much to see that we are still not talking about creating a universe from nothing, or answering the question of why there is something rather than nothing. Krauss suspects that at the time of Plato (423-347BC), or even St Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274), they were defining nothing as empty space, as they considered why there was something rather than nothing. I suspect that this is very far from the truth.

Why is there something instead of nothing? My definition of nothing, and I would have thought, the definition of everybody else except scientists, is that nothing means absolutely and entirely nothing at all. Therefore no space, no time, no physics, no mathematics, no nothing! Krauss complains about people redefining nothing to suit their purposes, but frankly, I believe that is exactly what he has done. To me, nothing means absolutely nothing at all.

So on to my argument. Yes, there could have been nothing at all instead of a universe. There really is no reason why there should be anything. Why bother? And who would there be to bother? Yet clearly we have a universe, as so ably described by Krauss and his fellow scientists. Therefore there can never have been the state of nothing, because if there were nothing, absolutely nothing at all, how would anything ever have got started? There would be no virtual particles to pop in and out of existence as suggested by quantum mechanics, and there would be no space in which they could pop. There would be no source of a multiverse and there would be no conditions to initiate a Big Bang.

It follows that something did pre-exist the Big Bang, and Krauss confirms that today’s thinking is that the Big Bang was a certainty. Great, I am perfectly happy with that, and happy that it happened too, as I am sure you are. It would also seem sensible to suggest that, whatever pre-existed the Big Bang, it has existed eternally, whatever that term might be interpreted to mean. There could never be the time, place or situation where there was nothing at all, as even this pre-existing state could never have got started.

My suggestion is that the eternal, pre-existing state was Consciousness. It could also be called Life or Being. By many people, especially those with religious beliefs and affiliations, It is called God (or their alternative words for God). In my book, whatever Its nature or qualities, that eternal, pre-existing state that enabled there to be something rather than nothing, and got the universe started, is absolutely worthy of the name God, whatever that Ultimate Reality is.


[1] Krauss, L., A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing, Free Press, New York, 2012

Why Did God Create a Universe? – Part 1 of 2

Before the universe was created, there was either absolutely nothing at all, or there was God-Consciousness. Since we have a complex universe around us, and you, I, and a few other people are here and alive, there could not have been nothing, since there would have been no motivation to get started and no raw material with which to start. Therefore, God-Consciousness had to exist prior to the start of the universe, prior to the Creation.

From my recent blogs you will have quite a good picture of God (or God-Consciousness), and perhaps an understanding of why I see Him as conscious, eternal, omnipotent, omnipresent, omniscient, Creator, having a purpose, omnibenevolent and immutable.

But why did God bother to create a universe?

If we picture the scene before the Creation . . . well, there is not much of a scene to picture:

There is God-Consciousness and nothing else.

There is God-Consciousness and nothing else.

There is God-Consciousness and nothing else.

There is God-Consciousness and nothing else.

There is God-Consciousness and nothing else.

Great isn’t it?

So, there is God-Consciousness and nothing else. And God-Consciousness is eternal, all-powerful, all-knowing, and all-present. What is the point? You might ask. And no doubt God asked Himself the same question.

God needed to experience Himself; God-Consciousness needed to experience Itself. At this stage, God-Consciousness was no more than Potential, formless Potential. While we cannot even start to conceive of what that must be like, it would seem obvious there was not a lot for God to see or do. It would be a lonely existence. So, God needed to do something about it.

Being omnipotent and omniscient, He created a ball of His Energy and placed it in a space in His Mind/Being/Consciousness.

He then caused it to explode in a tremendous Big Bang…

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Before we continue too far through this story, let’s spend a few moments looking at the motivation God-Consciousness had at this time.

God’s situation can be the same as ours. If He were not aware or conscious of His own Being, He would cease to exist. Since Consciousness needs to exist or there would be absolutely nothing, we can take it that God is aware of God-Consciousness, always, eternally.

If we consider the time before the Creation, before the Big Bang, we can see there was nothing except God-Consciousness. Nothing at all. Do you not think, in our terms, that God would be bored? His experience would be of…. Well, not a lot anyway. It would be like looking at a blank photograph. A photo of the inside of the lens cap. Looking at that eternally, that is, forever.

The story continues in Part Two…

(Parts of this blog are quoted from Chapter 8 of my book, The God Franchise)